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Our Environmental Policy

Dear Customer,

We, at Frank's Furs believe that wildlife management through sustainable harvesting practices is indispensable for the improvement of animal welfare and important for a healthy balance of our ecosystem. Our concerns towards wildlife conservation and the environment, has led us to establish an environmental policy which will guide our practices. These policies are:

-Frank's Furs will only do business with fur harvesters and suppliers that behave and respect the policies of the International Fur Federation agreement of 1997. These policies establish human treatment and harvesting of animals whether animals are being trapped because they are considered a danger to public safety, a nuisance, or for their fur and nutritional values.

-Frank's Furs will do its outmost effort to promote and select only recycled furs in designing and creating their garments.

-Frank's Furs will not buy or sales fur from endangered species.

-Frank's Fur will only utilize wildlife animals which are of abundance in Canada and accordance with national and provincial wildlife management legislations.


Please review the following letters from several provincial and national authorities who have endorsed the fur industry in Canada. (Sources provided by thefur council of Canada)

Alberta Environmental Protection (Office of the Minister Responsible for Forests, Parks and Wildlife)
British Columbia (Minister of the Environment)
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador (Department of Forest Resources & Agrifoods, Inland Fish and Wildlife Division)
Ontario (Fish & Wildlife Branch)
Quebec (Department of Natural Resources and Wildlife)
Saskatchewan (Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment)


Alberta Environmental Protection
Office of the Minister Responsible for Forests, Parks and Wildlife

Concerned citizens:

There has been much public concern expressed in recent years over the practices of the trapping industry and the use of wild furs in the production of fine clothing. Alberta Environment Protection would like to take this opportunity to assure the public that trapping in Alberta is a well-regulated industry that contributes meaningfully to the economy, particularly to the welfare of the province's northern residents, many of whom are of Aboriginal descent and are maintaining a traditional lifestyle.

Trappers in Alberta are licensed and their harvests carefully monitored by staff of Environmental Protection. Trappers themselves must comply with strict regulations and are required to register with the provincial government any fisher, wolverine, otter and lynx harvested to comply with management quotas. The most common animals taken by trappers, such as muskrat, beaver and coyote, are abundant in the wild and the harvest of fur poses no risk to their status. Alberta does not permit the trapping of species considered to be at risk and provides additional protection to all endangered species.

Alberta has also been among Canada's leaders in the development of humane trapping standards and research into improved trapping practices. Canada is signatory to the new agreement on international humane trapping standards; Alberta will implement the national standards adopted as a result of this agreement.


British Columbia
British Columbia Environment

All British Columbians recognize the importance of wildlife conservation, and the two key areas that contribute most to it are habitat protection and wildlife management. Living as we do in one of the most spectacular and beautiful parks of the world, and blessed with an abundance and diversity of wildlife, we must never take this bounty for granted. We must ensure that we protect the natural heritage of our province - now and for the generations that are to come.

Trapping has a long history in British Columbia, and provides food, employment and recreation for trappers and their families. In British Columbia, approximately 6,000 trappers - about half are Aboriginal - actively manage sixteen furbearer species, following standards, legislation and regulations developed by the Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks. Substantial progress has been made in the implementation of humane trapping techniques and in education trappers to use more humane methods. The province's trapper education program is compulsory for all beginning trappers seeking a license in British Columbia, and has been welcomed by many First Nations trappers. Licensed trappers must also undertake an advanced course to ensure that they are schooled in humane trapping techniques.

As a member of the Fur Institute of Canada, British Columbia supports humane trap research, development and testing, and remains strongly committed to legislating the most humane trapping possible. Substantial progress has been made through the years in the implementation of humane trapping techniques and in educating trappers to use more humane methods.

In July 1997, Canada was one of many signatory countries to an international agreement to improve the performance of trapping devices used to capture nineteen furbearers found in Canada, Russia and the European Union (EU). Seen as a critical step in improving animal welfare, nationally and internationally, this important agreement establishes humane trapping standards whether animals are being trapped because they are considered a danger to public safety, a nuisance, or for their fur and nutritional values.


Government Of Newfoundland and Labrador
Department of Forest Resources & Agrifoods
Inland Fish and Wildlife Division

To whom it may concern:

Many people have misconceptions about trapping and the use of wild furs. That's why the Department of Forest Resources and Agrifoods, Inland Fish and Wildlife Division is taking this opportunity to let you know that regulated trapping plays an important role in the responsible management and conservation of wildlife and natural habitat. Please consider the following points.

Fur is a natural product and a renewable resource. Also, meat from fur bearing animals is often used by trappers and their families.
No endangered or threatened species may be hunted or used in the fur trade. These species are protected by provincial, federal and international laws.
The fur-bearing species harvested in this province are abundant, and significant effort is directed at monitoring the populations of these species.
The allocation of funds which are made available annually to manage and monitor furbearing and non game species exceeds the amount collected from license fees.
Not just anyone can participate in trapping activities. A comprehensive 20 hour trapper education course must be successfully completed before a trapping license is issued to applicants.
Trapping is rigorously controlled in Canada. Provincial and territorial regulations prevent excessive trapping and ensure the use of the best trapping systems available to enhance animals-welfare and conservation.
All of society benefits - directly or indirectly - from well-regulated hunting and trapping. These activities help to maintain stable and healthy wildlife populations by removing access animals from a population so starvation, disease, habitat damage and overcrowding does not occur. Trapping also helps reduce damage to property while providing useful products for human use.


Ontario
Fish & Wildlife Branch

Dear Fur Garment Owner:

Many people have misconceptions about fur trapping and the use of wild furs. That's why we're taking this opportunity to let you know that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources supports regulated fur trapping for harvesting common species of furbearers. Consider the following points:

Most of society benefits, either directly or indirectly, from trapping. These activities help reduce wildlife damage to human property, provide funds for wildlife management and conservation programs, provide products for human use and provide jobs.
Trapping provides income, recreation and an outdoor lifestyle for many citizens through the use of a renewable natural resource. It is part of North American heritage. Trapping is often vital to the subsistence and self-sufficiency of people in remote regions who have few other economic alternatives.
No endangered or threatened species are trapped. All such species are protected by international, national, and/or provincial laws.
Furbearing populations are monitored by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. All twenty-two species that are trapped for their fur are abundant, and are responsible for the majority of the nuisance animal complaints that occur each year in Ontario. Many species like raccoon, beaver and coyote are near record levels of abundance.
Trapping is highly regulated. These regulations prevent over harvesting and make sure that harvest methods are as humane as possible given the current technology. Regulations restrict the type and size of traps used, the frequency with which they are checked, and the time and places where trapping may occur. Trappers are required to successfully complete mandatory training courses. Regulations are enforced by specially trained Conservation Officers.
Trapping occurs in the fall and winter to avoid the capture of newborns or mothers with dependent young.
Trappers contribute to the more than $40 million raised annually to fund fish and wildlife conservation and management in Ontario through license fees and royalties paid to the province.


FUR AND TRAPPING IN QUEBEC

Many people have misconceptions about trapping and the use of wild furs. That's why theMinistere des Ressources naturelles et de la Faune(Department of Natural Resources and Wildlife) is taking this opportunity to let you know that regulated trapping in Québec plays an important role in the responsible management and conservation of wildlife. Wear your fur garment proudly and never forget that:

Fur is a natural product and a renewable resource. Meat from furbearing animals and the use of by-products in arts and crafts are other benefits trapping provides.
No endangered or threatened species may be hunted or used in the fur trade. These species are protected by provincial and federal laws as well as by international agreements.
The 18 furbearing species used in Québec are abundant. The most commonly used species, including beaver, muskrat and raccoon, are more abundant now than they have ever been.
Not just anyone can go trapping. A special training course must be successfully completed before a trapping licence is issued.
Trapping is rigorously controlled in Canada. Provincial and territorial regulations prevent excessive trapping and ensure the use of the best trapping systems available to enhance animal-welfare and conservation. Regulations are enforced by specially trained wildlife conservation officers.
All of society benefits - directly or indirectly - from well regulated hunting and trapping. These activities help to maintain stable and healthy wildlife populations, while reducing damage to property and providing useful products for human use.

Meat from furbearing animals and the use of by-products in arts and crafts are other benefits trapping provides.


FUR MANAGEMENT AND TRAPPING IN SASKATCHEWAN

There are often concerns expressed regarding the impact of trapping on furbearer populations and the degree to which humane standards are followed by trappers in Saskatchewan. That is why the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment is taking this opportunity to let you know that regulated trapping in this province plays an important role in the management and conservation of wildlife. Wear your fur garment proudly and never forget that:

-Fur is a natural product and a renewable resource. Meat from furbearing animals and the use of by-products in arts and crafts are other benefits trapping provides.

-No endangered or threatened species may be hunted or used in the fur trade. These species are protected by provincial and federal laws as well as by international agreements.

-The 10 most commonly trapped furbearing species in Saskatchewan are abundant. The most commonly used species, including beaver, muskrat and coyote, are more abundant now than they have ever been.

-Not just anyone can go trapping. A special training course must be successfully completed before a trapping license is issued.

-Trapping is rigorously controlled in Canada. Provincial and territorial regulations prevent excessive trapping and ensure the use of the best trapping systems available to enhance animal-welfare and conservation. Regulations are enforced by specially trained wildlife conservation officers.

-Trappers assist wildlife managers in Saskatchewan in assessing furbearer abundance. Trappers in Saskatchewan submit survey information as part of a voluntary population management survey undertaken by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment. These data are used to monitor trends in species abundance and to alert managers if there are serious declines in species populations.

-Trapping is an important cultural tradition for many aboriginal people in northern Saskatchewan. The majority of Saskatchewan’s trappers are of aboriginal descent. Trapping has important traditional cultural values for this community as well as providing important supplementary income.

-All of society benefits - directly or indirectly - from well regulated hunting and trapping. These activities help to maintain stable and healthy wildlife populations, while reducing damage to property and providing useful products for human use.


If you would like more information, please feel free to contact us atcservice@franksfurs.comor call us (506)546-6464

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